Monday, November 29, 2021

More about Authors for Literacy on December 11 in Lexington, SC

 Have you ever dreamed of

writing & publishing a book?
8 authors will show you how

Are you among the 81% of us in Lexington County who feel they have a book in them — and should write it?
Research indicates that’s more than 240,000 people who aspire to become published authors. 
Local authors will show you how they did it – and you can, too – at the Lexington Library Saturday, Dec. 11.
The authors are Tom Poland, Halina Schafer, Ralph Jarrells, Jay Schabacker, Alysia Kehoe and Cat Fitzgerald.
They will speak at the Authors for Literacy annual book signing and author workshop 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 11.
18 local authors will autograph their books for those on your Christmas gift list.
They make memorable and unique Christmas gifts.
The event raises money for Turning Pages adult literacy tutoring to teach illiterate people to read, write and develop other career-enhancing




skills.
The event will be at the Lexington County Library, 5440 Augusta Road (US 1), just east of downtown Lexington.
Authors for Literacy, the Lexington County Library, the Lexington County Chronicle, The Fish Wrapper and Sign It Quick team up each year to raise money for Turning Pages adult literacy tutoring each year.
Authors include Pat McNeely, Tom Poland, Ralph Jarrells, Bonnie Stanard, Kathy Widener, Linda Maguire, Scott Vaughan, John Starino, Arthur Turfa, Johnny Bloodworth, Sharon Durgin, Claudette Holliday, Alysia Kehoe, Cat Fitzgerald, Halina Schafer, Charlie Farrell, Don Gordon and Jerry Bellune will personally autograph their books for those on your Christmas gift list. 
The books priced at $10 and $20 make unique Christmas gifts.
For details, contact Jerry Bellune at 803-331-6695 or JerryBellune@yahoo.com

Sunday, November 28, 2021

Faith Paulsen's "Cyanometer" on Finishing Line Press

 Faith Paulsen’s third chapbook touches on several topics, but the one that speaks to me most is family. The poet does not emphasize family; there are other themes. For whatever reason, that is what resonsates the most with me at this time.

   The title comes from an 18th Century scientific device for measuring the blueness of the sky. Regardless of the actual shade of blue, it is still the sky. Paulsen looks at the nuances with repect to people, places, and objects.

   A good example is found in “Mother in Law”. She wanted to be known to the poet as “Mom”, but a variety of other names appears by which the older woman was known


: “Umbrella in Sunshine” “Three Phone Calls a Day”. There are nanes given to the poet herself. Over time the poet finds herself sliding into the role of an older woman in the family herself. There is neither shock nor horror here, but rather the awareness. Readers can do what they wish with it.

    The poem describing the cyanometer, while not exactly a title poem , nevertheless establishes the framework for Paulsen. After naming different shades of blues, mentioning a disparate group of people, she states  her desire to “make my body an instrument to measure the blues”. (The poem is entitled “In 1789, a scientist invented.”.

     “My Brother and I Shared a Bathroom” has a tone that is gentle and reflective as years of memories are compressed into 31 lines, as the siblings “,,,rattled like commuter trains/ from dollhouses to Legos and bac.”

     Other poems deal with a father’s piano, a son teaching overseas, and a mother continuing the theme of family. Never maudlin, the poet looks at the nuances in her perceptions of long ago and the present,

     The remaining poems provide opportunities for nuances. Senior citizens discuss a John Ashberry poem, the Marianas Trench receives a letter,  and other people are mentioned.  “Cyanometer” is a book of poems that will delight readers as they read and reread the variety of poems found in it.

Arthur Turfa, “Saluda Reflections,” Finishing Line Press 2017. “The Botleys of Beaumount County”, Blurb,

Friday, November 26, 2021

Why Get Caught Up in Black Friday Mayhem? Shop here for Some Good Books!

      Crowds of people trying to find the "perfect gift" and being frustrated by delays, empty shelves, and some buying into the conspiracy theory du jour!

     When we lived in Northeastern PA, my family would see a show on Broadway, go to Ellis Island, or visit Philly and avoid hordes of shoppers.

     Here are some links to my poetry books and my literary fiction novel!  Thanks!

https://www.amazon.com/Arthur-Turfa/e/B00YJ9LNOA%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

https://www.blurb.com/b/10799783-the-botleys-of-beaumont-county

      And have fun avoiding the crowds!









Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Hearing Good Things about "The Botleys of Beaumont County"

https://www.blurb.com/b/10799783-the-botleys-of-beaumont-county 


     It is on Blurb, which sadly does not have space for readers' comments. But feel free to comment wherever you are on social media!  Literary fiction novel!

\


Sunday, November 14, 2021

Authors for Literacy Dec. 11, 1-3 pm Lexington SC Public Library

 Authors raise money for literacy tutoring

I will be with a group of local poets/writers on Saturday, December 11, from 1-3 p.m. at the Lexington Public Library Main Branch, 5440 Augusta Rd (US 1),)

https://lexcolibrary.com

All books are either $10 or $20, with some profits going to charity.



 





Saturday, November 6, 2021

Some Guy Fawkes Allusion in Eliot's "The Hollow Men"

https://allpoetry.com/the-hollow-men 


A day late but we were busy. A visit to some county offices for tax rates on our new house, and then one last visit to the old house before we close on selling it next week.

Wednesday, November 3, 2021

Bialys- Frozen, but still Bialys!

    A bialy is not a bagel. Bialys have a bottom and are baked, not boiled then baked, like the better-known bagel.      Enough with the all...